Hey: seriously, it's time to balance (part 2)


Everybody knows that eating requires money -- unless you're a nomadic farmer and fisherman. (I'm guessing that none of you are).

 

In a similar vein, sleeping involves resting within a physical shelter that you've taken over for such purposes.

 

In our evolutionary past, a cave did the trick.

 

In the 21st century, on the other hand, enjoying respite within the security of such residence entails acquiring and maintaining a house or apartment.

 

AND THAT means paying monthly rent or a mortgage. 

 

Here's the point: Whether we accept the fact or not, we need a certain amount of money to survive. And in today's day and age, this influx of money stems from something called a job.

 

QUESTION: DO WE ACTUALLY NEED TO WORK AS HARD AS WE DO TO GET WHAT WE WANT AND NEED?

 

wipebook whiteboard notebook and dry erase where is the beach 

DO WE REALLY HAVE TO GRIND IT OUT THOUGH?

Let us add, (as Seinfeld said in one of his classic episodes), not that there's anything wrong with that.

 

But is it necessary -- or even smart?

 

Let's compare North Americans to Europeans for a moment. I have a cousin that just came over from France for a week. After just a few minutes of sitting down with him, I realized that he comes from a different mind-set when it comes to work. For instance:

  • North Americans love to work. Did you know that the average American accrues 18 vacation days and uses only 16?
  • On the other hand, the average French worker takes more than twice the vacation time -- like my cousin.

 

To some, this statistic emphasizes a key difference between American and European workers. With the Protestant work ethic passed down to American cultures throughout the centuries, we automatically compare these disparate perspectives on work and respite in separatist terms: WE are productive, and THEY are lazy.

 

wipebook whiteboard notebook and dry erase work smarter not harder 

SERIOUSLY, WORK SMARTER, NOT HARDER

But here's a thought: The statistic might very well indicate the opposite. Europeans understand that breaks improve workplace efficiency. We, on the other hand, mistakenly believe that putting in more hours increases productivity, while ignoring scientific evidence in neuroscience stating that we need to work smarter, not harder. That includes catching taking frequent breaks and getting a good night's sleep.

 

THERE YOU HAVE HAVE IT: if you want to get your stuff done quicker and more "efficaciously"; work smarter.... not hard, and balance it out.

 

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